About Freemasonry

Freemasonry teaches moral lessons and self-knowledge through participation in progressive two-part plays; although a private organisation with attendance open to members only you can obtain all you wish to know just be visiting your local library and reading the many books published about the rituals or on the Internet.

However, our modes of recognition are not used indiscriminately but solely as a test of membership when visiting a lodge. Openness is now greatly encouraged and you will find that a Freemason will be only too willing to tell you about the work within the Lodge, albeit our ceremonies remain private.

The meeting is in two parts. As in any organisation, business such as the minutes of meetings, electing new members, voting on any appointment of officers, financial matters and general correspondence is undertaken. The ceremonial aspect of the meeting deals with admitting new Masons and the annual installation of the Master and his Officers. The ceremony for admitting a new Mason is in two parts – a slight dramatical instruction in the principles and lessons of the Craft followed by the candidate’s duties. On completion of the meeting a formal dinner is held, called the Festive Board, during which the social aspect of Freemasonry is heartedly extended.

There are a variety of reasons why people become Freemasons. Some as a result of family tradition but many because they seek the fellowship that is to be found throughout the Fraternity.

Freemasonry is a challenging activity both to ones inner-self as well as to memorising their individual roles in the ceremonies. The social gatherings are important too with the opportunity to take part in various activities during the year. These events may be both formal as well as informal with the emphasis on encouraging the family to come along and be part of Masonic life.